Fishers City Council approves Employment Node District, 2017 budget

0

Compiled by Nick Poust

The Fishers City Council met Oct. 17 to approve multiple zoning ordinances and further discuss the 2017 city budget. The next city council meeting is scheduled to take place 7 p.m. Nov. 21 at city hall.

McGrath

McGrath

What happened: Among the many ordinances discussed, creating the most buzz was the ordinance proposed by Deputy Mayor Leah McGrath regarding rezoning real estate which had been for Sunbeam Development Corporations and Lantern Road use. The motion was passed by the city council, which means that land, including real estate from 106th St. to 116th St., would establish the Employment Node District. McGrath said it represents the start of the Fishers 2040 Plan.

What it means: The ordinance’s approval means this land is taken out of the hands of Sunbeam Co. and Lantern Road.

“Starting with Employment Node was important for us,” McGrath said. “There is a real priority placed on bringing more job opportunities that are quality and high-paying jobs for our residents.”

After the approval of this rezoning ordinance, Ken Kern, representing Sunbeam Development Corporation, said he was “shocked” by the city council’s decision.

“We’re a little shocked that now you’re coming back and saying what was good enough for 30 years is not good anymore. We’re going to try to throw away your zoning ordinance and let the town decide,” Kern said.

 

What happened: A motion for a second reading was passed regarding the rezoning of a 44-acre piece of property on the north side of 96th Steet, adjacent to the Hancock County Line. Corby Thompson of Boomerang Development is looking to develop a 101-lot, single-family residential subdivision for Arbor Homes within the space.

What it means:  The Fishers Plan Commission reviewed the proposed rezoning Oct. 11 and gave a positive recommendation. The property is currently considered suburban residential, under the Fishers 2040 Plan.

“This Fishers 2040 Plan throws out the strict, comprehensive plan and lets us be creative,” Thompson said. “Let’s be connective. Let’s be vibrant. Let’s have diversity all across Fishers, not just in places, but all across. As a developer, it’s a lightbulb. Let’s go, let’s do it.”

Zimmerman

Zimmerman

Arbor Homes residences, as presented, would cost an average of $248,000. Two other CalAtlantic Planned Unit Developments Thompson is behind average between $135,000 and $325,000 per residence. Members of the city council expressed concern about the pricing.

“We’ve got to be mindful of a mixture of home prices that impact every segment of our community,” council member Todd Zimmerman said. “This is about making sure we have the best product, the best prices, and a mixture in our housing availability.”

What’s next: The second reading will take place during the Fishers City Council meeting Nov. 21.

 

What happened: The 2017 Municipal Budget was passed, but amidst this unanimous decision was the call for salary increases within the city council by Council Member Brad DeReamer.

DeReamer

DeReamer

“We have the highest-paid mayor, and I’m proud of that,” DeReamer said. “At the same time we have the second-lowest paid clerk, and that’s embarrassing.”

According to DeReamer, the average clerk salary among second-class cities is $65,000. With that in mind, DeReamer’s motion was for Fishers’ city clerk to make that average. Since the salary ordinance was passed in September, DeReamer’s motion was to add an agenda item to amend the salary ordinance.

The motion to entertain a first reading was denied by the council.


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Fishers City Council approves Employment Node District, 2017 budget

0

Compiled by Nick Poust

The Fishers City Council met Oct. 17 to approve multiple zoning ordinances and further discuss the 2017 city budget. The next city council meeting is scheduled to take place 7 p.m. Nov. 21 at city hall.

McGrath

McGrath

What happened: Among the many ordinances discussed, creating the most buzz was the ordinance proposed by Deputy Mayor Leah McGrath regarding rezoning real estate which had been for Sunbeam Development Corporations and Lantern Road use. The motion was passed by the city council, which means that land, including real estate from 106th St. to 116th St., would establish the Employment Node District. McGrath said it represents the start of the Fishers 2040 Plan.

What it means: The ordinance’s approval means this land is taken out of the hands of Sunbeam Co. and Lantern Road.

“Starting with Employment Node was important for us,” McGrath said. “There is a real priority placed on bringing more job opportunities that are quality and high-paying jobs for our residents.”

After the approval of this rezoning ordinance, Ken Kern, representing Sunbeam Development Corporation, said he was “shocked” by the city council’s decision.

“We’re a little shocked that now you’re coming back and saying what was good enough for 30 years is not good anymore. We’re going to try to throw away your zoning ordinance and let the town decide,” Kern said.

 

What happened: A motion for a second reading was passed regarding the rezoning of a 44-acre piece of property on the north side of 96th Steet, adjacent to the Hancock County Line. Corby Thompson of Boomerang Development is looking to develop a 101-lot, single-family residential subdivision for Arbor Homes within the space.

What it means:  The Fishers Plan Commission reviewed the proposed rezoning Oct. 11 and gave a positive recommendation. The property is currently considered suburban residential, under the Fishers 2040 Plan.

“This Fishers 2040 Plan throws out the strict, comprehensive plan and lets us be creative,” Thompson said. “Let’s be connective. Let’s be vibrant. Let’s have diversity all across Fishers, not just in places, but all across. As a developer, it’s a lightbulb. Let’s go, let’s do it.”

Zimmerman

Zimmerman

Arbor Homes residences, as presented, would cost an average of $248,000. Two other CalAtlantic Planned Unit Developments Thompson is behind average between $135,000 and $325,000 per residence. Members of the city council expressed concern about the pricing.

“We’ve got to be mindful of a mixture of home prices that impact every segment of our community,” council member Todd Zimmerman said. “This is about making sure we have the best product, the best prices, and a mixture in our housing availability.”

What’s next: The second reading will take place during the Fishers City Council meeting Nov. 21.

 

What happened: The 2017 Municipal Budget was passed, but amidst this unanimous decision was the call for salary increases within the city council by Council Member Brad DeReamer.

DeReamer

DeReamer

“We have the highest-paid mayor, and I’m proud of that,” DeReamer said. “At the same time we have the second-lowest paid clerk, and that’s embarrassing.”

According to DeReamer, the average clerk salary among second-class cities is $65,000. With that in mind, DeReamer’s motion was for Fishers’ city clerk to make that average. Since the salary ordinance was passed in September, DeReamer’s motion was to add an agenda item to amend the salary ordinance.

The motion to entertain a first reading was denied by the council.


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By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
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