Carmel school board names new school

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The Carmel Clay Schools Board of Trustees met Jan. 13 for its first meeting of 2020. The next school board meeting is set for 7 p.m. Jan. 27 at the Educational Services Center, 5201 N. Main St. For more, or to see an agenda, visit ccs.k12.in.us/board.

What happened: The board voted in favor of a name for the district’s newest elementary school.

What it means: The new elementary near the northeast corner of Clay Center Road and 116th Street will be named Clay Center Elementary. The board voted 5-0 in favor of the naming. Read more at youarecurrent.com.

 

What happened: Mike Kerschner, Katie Browning and Lin Zheng were elected as the board president, vice president and secretary, respectively.

What it means: The nominations passed with a unanimous vote from fellow board members.

 

What happened: The board set 2020 salaries for school board members.

What it means: Under the recommendation of administration and per state statute, board members will continue earning a $2,000 annual salary in 2020. The board approved the salaries 5-0.

 

What happened: The board appointed a board treasurer and deputy treasurer.

What it means: Under the recommendation of CCS administration, Roger McMichael was named treasurer and Kara Kollros deputy treasurer. All board members voted in favor of the appointments.

 

What happened: The board appointed its general counsel for 2020.

What it means: Nominated by CCS administration, David Day of Church Church Hittle + Antrim was named general counsel after a unanimous vote from the board.

 

What happened: The board appointed its executive secretary for 2020.

What it means: Nominated by CCS administration, Colleen Nobis was named executive secretary after a unanimous vote from the board.

 

What happened: The board appointed its cable television representative for 2020.

What it means: Nominated by CCS administration, Christi Cloud was named after a unanimous vote from the board.

 

What happened: Board member Layla Spanenberg was appointed as the Indiana School Boards Association delegate and the Indiana School Boards legislative liaison.

What it means: The board approved the appointment 5-0.

 

What happened: Board member Lin Zheng was appointed to the Carmel Clay Parks Dept. board.

What it means: Each year, a member of the school board is selected to fill a seat on the Carmel Clay Parks Dept. board. The school board unanimously approved the appointment of Zheng.

 

What happened: Board member Katie Browning was appointed to the Carmel Clay Redevelopment Commission.

What it means: Each year, a member of the school board is selected to fill a seat on the Carmel Redevelopment Commission. The school board unanimously approved the appointment of Browning.

 

What happened: Roger McMichael, associate superintendent of business affairs, gave a presentation to the board on the financial health of the school district.

What it means: Per a new state requirement passed in the 2019 legislative session, school district administration is now required to submit a report that assesses the financial condition of the district. Highlighting overall funding, McMichael said in 2019, the referendum fund made up 19 percent of the district’s total funding. Overall, McMichael said CCS has maintained financial stability from 2011 through 2019 and that the average cash balance is 9.5 percent over that period. He said the district goal is 8 percent.

 

What happened: The board approved changes for an insurance plan.

What it means: Board members voted in favor of making a change of enrollment eligibility to its prime health insurance plan.

McMichael explained the reasoning for the change, citing the new teacher contract that was approved in fall 2019.

“Because that contract only applied to teachers, this (change will) include other employees with that same standard,” McMichael said. “When that plan falls below 20 percent (teacher) participation … we will discontinue that plan, in which case any remaining employees that were taking that plan would have a choice to take one of the other remaining three plans. Participation currently is about 28 percent. It will take some time, just through turnover and so forth, before we would drop below the 20 percent.”

Kerschner abstained from voting because he said he believed he was enrolled in plan in question. Remaining board members voted unanimously for the change that will ultimately phase out the district’s lowest-deductible insurance plan option.

 

What happened: Assistant Supt. Amy Dudley presented on CCS’s recent literacy program evaluation.

What it means: During the presentation, Dudley discussed the formation of the committee – made up of parents, teachers and administrators – their research, as well as their findings and recommendations for enhancing the district’s overall literacy program. Read more at youarecurrent.com.

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