Council approves Village Park Plaza renovations, hears five new items

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By Noah Alatza

The Westfield City Council met Aug. 14. The next meeting is 7 p.m. Aug. 28 at City Hall, 130 Penn St. For more, visit westfield.in.gov.

An updated rendering of the Village Park Plaza renovations. (Submitted photo)

What happened: Council unanimously approved Village Park Plaza expansion and upgrades.

What it means: After a favorable recommendation from the Advisory Plan Commission, the city council approved Village Park Plaza renovations, 7-0. Nearly $10 million will be spent by developer Washington Prime Group to remodel and add retail shopping to the Regal Cinema theater at Greyhound Pass and 146th Street. The project includes redesigning 12,000 square feet on the south end of the 57,600-square-foot movie theater. The group will turn the space into four retail or restaurant venues facing 146th Street. The interior of the theater also will be renovated.

 

What happened: Osborne Trails Planned Unit Development Amendment was passed, 7-0.

What it means: A favorable recommendation was sent to the council from the APC on Aug. 7.

The PUD would allow for a mixed-use development with single-family residential, single-family attached residential and commercial uses at 191st Street from Six Points Road to Horton Road. The development was formerly known as Drexler Woods. The amendment incorporates land east of Horton Road and more to the north of 191st St. A roundabout north of Grand Park could eventually link 193rd Street and Horton Road.

 

What happened: Five new items were introduced to the council, four were forwarded to the APC for further review and public hearings set for Sept. 5. The fifth item was a fireworks ordinance unanimously repealed by the council.

What it means:

  • The Bridgewater PUD District Amendment

The amendment calls for certain signage standards for the Bridgewater Business Park off of Gray Road. If the APC sends a positive recommendation on the PUD, the council could vote as early as its Sept. 25 meeting. Councilwoman Cindy Spoljaric raised doubt during the introduction.

“The language seemed a bit ambiguous. What standards will apply to the whole site?” Spoljaric said. She then asked for clarification, saying in part that she thought the sign standards “applied to the entire PUD.”

  • Newby PUD

At nearly 18 acres, the PUD is just north of 171st Streeet to the west of the City Services Center. Family owned Newby Farms currently sits on the land. The PUD is currently zoned for Agriculture/Single Family districts. Potential uses include agritourism, an equestrian facility and up to two single family homes. The council plans to vote on the PUD at its Oct. 9 meeting, if the APC sends a positive recommendation.

“The intention of what I am trying to do  is preserve the farm as much as possible,” owner Kevin Newby said. “We want educational activities for the kids, including things such as a pumpkin search. We want to teach them more about gardening. The equestrian piece of it kind of goes hand-in-hand. It is about preserving the farm itself.”

Newby said the original PUD is not up to par and does not allow for additional activities.

  • Chatham Hills Planned Unit Development District Amendment IV

The amendment asks for an additional 15 acres north of Chatham Hills. Developers want to incorporate the land for better access in future phases of the development, according to city planner Pam Howard.

  • Oak Hollow at Bridgewater (Bridgewater PUD Amendment)

The council heard presentations on a proposal for a new section of Bridgewater. The neighborhood, Oak Hollow at Bridgewater, would be northwest of 151st Street and Carey Road. Half-acre lots dot the entrance and around a natural lake. It would have large lots with buffer trees. A roundabout would connect to the new section of Oak Park on Oak Road, while another entrance would join Carey Road from the west.

Spoljaric raised doubts about how heavily traveled the nearby roads are and if potential rear back yards of the homes will be affected.

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