Camp Kwajok celebrates Korean culture, traditions for adoptive families

0

By Daniel Lee

Camp Kwajok organizers Tara Vander Woude and Kim Kwon. Local Koreans gather with the families of adopted Korean children each year to teach families about Korean culture and traditions. (Submitted photo)

Camp Kwajok organizers Tara Vander Woude and Kim Kwon. Local Koreans gather with the families of adopted Korean children each year to teach families about Korean culture and traditions. (Submitted photo)

The Korean Presbyterian Church of Indiana held its annual Camp Kwajok, or camp family, on July 23 in Fishers. On this day, families who have adopted Korean children gather to learn about and experience Korean culture.

“Korean adoptive families want to know something about their children’s culture, and in this way we are helping them get to know what the Korean mindset, food, and language are like,” coordinator Kim Kwon said.

Most adoptive families are American, and many do not understand their kids’ backgrounds. Camp Kwajok helps families overcome this barrier and bond. Basically, the  camp is a crash course geared to opening families up and helping them accept each other.

“I think the first time, (adopters) are not very open-minded. But now we have had more than 10 years to do Camp Kwajok. Even though we meet only once a year, we know each other, and we are like family,” Kwon said.

Since Camp Kwajok opened its doors in 2007, attendance has grown. Every year, new families join the camp, and families that have attended in past years join, as well. Camp Kwajok is open to anyone who wants to experience Korean culture.

“Since we live in America, our kids don’t know much about Korean culture, so this is a good opportunity to teach them. Even us adults learn so many things throughout Camp Kwajok. I think this is a benefit for Korean adoptive families and Koreans in America,” Kwon said.


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Camp Kwajok celebrates Korean culture, traditions for adoptive families

0

By Daniel Lee

The Korean Presbyterian Church of Indiana held its annual Camp Kwajok, or camp family, on July 23 in Fishers. On this day, families who have adopted Korean children gather to learn about and experience Korean culture.

Camp Kwajok organizers Tara Vander Woude and Kim Kwon. Local Koreans gather with the families of adopted Korean children each year to teach families about Korean culture and traditions. (Submitted photo)

Camp Kwajok organizers Tara Vander Woude and Kim Kwon. Local Koreans gather with the families of adopted Korean children each year to teach families about Korean culture and traditions. (Submitted photo)

“Korean adoptive families want to know something about their children’s culture, and in this way we are helping them get to know what the Korean mindset, food, and language are like,” coordinator Kim Kwon said.

Most adoptive families are American, and many do not understand their kids’ backgrounds. Camp Kwajok helps families overcome this barrier and bond. Basically, the  camp is a crash course geared to opening families up and helping them accept each other.

“I think the first time, (adopters) are not very open-minded. But now we have had more than 10 years to do Camp Kwajok. Even though we meet only once a year, we know each other, and we are like family,” Kwon said.

Since Camp Kwajok opened its doors in 2007, attendance has grown. Every year, new families join the camp, and families that have attended in past years join, as well. Camp Kwajok is open to anyone who wants to experience Korean culture.

“Since we live in America, our kids don’t know much about Korean culture, so this is a good opportunity to teach them. Even us adults learn so many things throughout Camp Kwajok. I think this is a benefit for Korean adoptive families and Koreans in America,” Kwon said.


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By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
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