Zionsville Town Council approves pedestrian, bikeway plan to comprehensive plan

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This map of downtown Zionsville shows changes that could be made a result of the Strategic Trails and Implementation Plan. The solid, red lines show existing pathways, and the dotted, red lines show proposed multi-use pathways. Solid, blue lines show existing sidewalks, and dotted blue lines show proposed sidewalks. Solid purple lines show existing shared lanes, and dotted purple lines show proposed bike lanes or shared lanes. The dotted green line shows a proposed greenway, and the solid yellow line shows existing interstate and highway. (Submitted map)

This map of downtown Zionsville shows changes that could be made a result of the Strategic Trails and Implementation Plan. The solid, red lines show existing pathways, and the dotted, red lines show proposed multi-use pathways. Solid, blue lines show existing sidewalks, and dotted blue lines show proposed sidewalks. Solid purple lines show existing shared lanes, and dotted purple lines show proposed bike lanes or shared lanes. The dotted green line shows a proposed greenway, and the solid yellow line shows existing interstate and highway. (Submitted map)

By Sadie Hunter

 

At it’s July 5 meeting, the Zionsville Town Council unanimously approved an amendment to the town’s comprehensive plan that will now include a pedestrian and bikeways plan, known as the Strategic Trails and Implementation Plan.

An executive summary of the plan states that the proposed projects within it will only enhance an already bike- and walking-friendly community.

“The plan includes infrastructure and program recommendations that are supported by an action-oriented implementation strategy to sustain momentum and progress for years,” the executive summary states.

The plan, which came to the council with a unanimous favorable recommendation from the Zionsville Plan Commission and Zionsville Parks Board was funded through a grant from Indiana State Dept. of Health and funds provided by the Town and Zionsville and the Zionsville Dept. of Parks and Recreation.

“We had a very robust public engagement as a part of this process,” consultant Tricia McClellan, principal at Rundell Ernstberger Associates, said. “We had 821 public responses to our community survey. In a town the size of Zionsville, we normally expect to get 100. The online mapping, we had … over 1,000 people that commented, which again, is just phenomenal.  The goal of community engagement was to try to hit every demographic that we could. All that information went into our analysis of the community, and what came out of that was the plan. That’s really the meat of the plan.”

The executive summary also includes a complete list of short-, mid- and long-range capital projects recommendations.

“This is a comprehensive plan to guide, as you progress forward, but also to be able to capitalize on opportunities that present themselves, whether those be grants that come up … donations that might be made, or development that comes in,” McClellan said. “You already have the framework in this plan that helps you guide those developers.”

To view the executive summary, visit bit.ly/29OTV41.


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