Opinion: Pence getting awful advice

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Gov. Mike Pence, who signed into law the contentious Religious Freedom Restoration Act, is taking his fair share of fire from everywhere, much like he did when he announced the formation of a state-run news bureau. While he reeled that initiative back in quickly, he presses forward with the RFRA, but wants changes in the legislation. State Republican legislators said last Thursday that the law will be amended to point out no person or persons will “be able to discriminate against anyone at any time.” Pence was on a national TV caravan of sorts, telling viewers in last week, “I abhor discrimination.” Pence said that he stood by the law and there was never any intent to create a “license to discriminate.” Our state – and, more to the point, our business community – is under duress over the passage of a law that would allow, if not rewritten, businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and other viewpoints. Pence had expected a revision of the legislation on his desk by the end of last week. The real question, in our opinion, is: Who is advising this guy with the tin ear? Is he nothing more than a yes man to them? While we believe it is a business owner’s right to refuse to serve any potential customer, we never would exercise that right. Shoot, if the ghost of Ted Kennedy came into our offices with a check for advertising a “How to (mis)handle liquor” campaign, we’d cash that check. That’s why we’re in business – last we looked – to make money. This act already is proving a drain on not only dollars, but also talent and potential business relocation and event/tourism opportunities. The RFRA doesn’t apply at our company – and it never will – for we welcome the opportunity to interact with and assist folks of varying faiths, color and lifestyles. With bad advice, Pence has thumbed his nose at the business sector, among others. Hey, anyone for separation of church and state? Our founding fathers certainly were, but that premise and practice have gone the way of the running board.



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Opinion: Pence getting awful advice

0

Gov. Mike Pence, who signed into law the contentious Religious Freedom Restoration Act, is taking his fair share of fire from everywhere, much like he did when he announced the formation of a state-run news bureau. While he reeled that initiative back in quickly, he presses forward with the RFRA, but wants changes in the legislation. State Republican legislators said last Thursday that the law will be amended to point out no person or persons will “be able to discriminate against anyone at any time.” Pence was on a national TV caravan of sorts, telling viewers in last week, “I abhor discrimination.” Pence said that he stood by the law and there was never any intent to create a “license to discriminate.” Our state – and, more to the point, our business community – is under duress over the passage of a law that would allow, if not rewritten, businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and other viewpoints. Pence had expected a revision of the legislation on his desk by the end of last week. The real question, in our opinion, is: Who is advising this guy with the tin ear? Is he nothing more than a yes man to them? While we believe it is a business owner’s right to refuse to serve any potential customer, we never would exercise that right. Shoot, if the ghost of Ted Kennedy came into our offices with a check for advertising a “How to (mis)handle liquor” campaign, we’d cash that check. That’s why we’re in business – last we looked – to make money. This act already is proving a drain on not only dollars, but also talent and potential business relocation and event/tourism opportunities. The RFRA doesn’t apply at our company – and it never will – for we welcome the opportunity to interact with and assist folks of varying faiths, color and lifestyles. With bad advice, Pence has thumbed his nose at the business sector, among others. Hey, anyone for separation of church and state? Our founding fathers certainly were, but that premise and practice have gone the way of the running board.



Share.

Opinion: Pence getting awful advice

0

Gov. Mike Pence, who signed into law the contentious Religious Freedom Restoration Act, is taking his fair share of fire from everywhere, much like he did when he announced the formation of a state-run news bureau. While he reeled that initiative back in quickly, he presses forward with the RFRA, but wants changes in the legislation. State Republican legislators said last Thursday that the law will be amended to point out no person or persons will “be able to discriminate against anyone at any time.” Pence was on a national TV caravan of sorts, telling viewers in last week, “I abhor discrimination.” Pence said that he stood by the law and there was never any intent to create a “license to discriminate.” Our state – and, more to the point, our business community – is under duress over the passage of a law that would allow, if not rewritten, businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and other viewpoints. Pence had expected a revision of the legislation on his desk by the end of last week. The real question, in our opinion, is: Who is advising this guy with the tin ear? Is he nothing more than a yes man to them? While we believe it is a business owner’s right to refuse to serve any potential customer, we never would exercise that right. Shoot, if the ghost of Ted Kennedy came into our offices with a check for advertising a “How to (mis)handle liquor” campaign, we’d cash that check. That’s why we’re in business – last we looked – to make money. This act already is proving a drain on not only dollars, but also talent and potential business relocation and event/tourism opportunities. The RFRA doesn’t apply at our company – and it never will – for we welcome the opportunity to interact with and assist folks of varying faiths, color and lifestyles. With bad advice, Pence has thumbed his nose at the business sector, among others. Hey, anyone for separation of church and state? Our founding fathers certainly were, but that premise and practice have gone the way of the running board.



Share.

Opinion: Pence getting awful advice

0

Gov. Mike Pence, who signed into law the contentious Religious Freedom Restoration Act, is taking his fair share of fire from everywhere, much like he did when he announced the formation of a state-run news bureau. While he reeled that initiative back in quickly, he presses forward with the RFRA, but wants changes in the legislation. State Republican legislators said last Thursday that the law will be amended to point out no person or persons will “be able to discriminate against anyone at any time.” Pence was on a national TV caravan of sorts, telling viewers in last week, “I abhor discrimination.” Pence said that he stood by the law and there was never any intent to create a “license to discriminate.” Our state – and, more to the point, our business community – is under duress over the passage of a law that would allow, if not rewritten, businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and other viewpoints. Pence had expected a revision of the legislation on his desk by the end of last week. The real question, in our opinion, is: Who is advising this guy with the tin ear? Is he nothing more than a yes man to them? While we believe it is a business owner’s right to refuse to serve any potential customer, we never would exercise that right. Shoot, if the ghost of Ted Kennedy came into our offices with a check for advertising a “How to (mis)handle liquor” campaign, we’d cash that check. That’s why we’re in business – last we looked – to make money. This act already is proving a drain on not only dollars, but also talent and potential business relocation and event/tourism opportunities. The RFRA doesn’t apply at our company – and it never will – for we welcome the opportunity to interact with and assist folks of varying faiths, color and lifestyles. With bad advice, Pence has thumbed his nose at the business sector, among others. Hey, anyone for separation of church and state? Our founding fathers certainly were, but that premise and practice have gone the way of the running board.



Share.

Opinion: Pence getting awful advice

0

Gov. Mike Pence, who signed into law the contentious Religious Freedom Restoration Act, is taking his fair share of fire from everywhere, much like he did when he announced the formation of a state-run news bureau. While he reeled that initiative back in quickly, he presses forward with the RFRA, but wants changes in the legislation. State Republican legislators said last Thursday that the law will be amended to point out no person or persons will “be able to discriminate against anyone at any time.” Pence was on a national TV caravan of sorts, telling viewers in last week, “I abhor discrimination.” Pence said that he stood by the law and there was never any intent to create a “license to discriminate.” Our state – and, more to the point, our business community – is under duress over the passage of a law that would allow, if not rewritten, businesses to discriminate based on sexual orientation and other viewpoints. Pence had expected a revision of the legislation on his desk by the end of last week. The real question, in our opinion, is: Who is advising this guy with the tin ear? Is he nothing more than a yes man to them? While we believe it is a business owner’s right to refuse to serve any potential customer, we never would exercise that right. Shoot, if the ghost of Ted Kennedy came into our offices with a check for advertising a “How to (mis)handle liquor” campaign, we’d cash that check. That’s why we’re in business – last we looked – to make money. This act already is proving a drain on not only dollars, but also talent and potential business relocation and event/tourism opportunities. The RFRA doesn’t apply at our company – and it never will – for we welcome the opportunity to interact with and assist folks of varying faiths, color and lifestyles. With bad advice, Pence has thumbed his nose at the business sector, among others. Hey, anyone for separation of church and state? Our founding fathers certainly were, but that premise and practice have gone the way of the running board.



Share.