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Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

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Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


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Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

0

Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

0

Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

0

Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

0

Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.

Opinion: Sever government’s lengthening arm

0

Our friends at Human Events sent a missive last week about the long arm of government getting longer. This time, the National Labor Relations Board on April 14 would like to make law that businesses must provide employees’ phone numbers and personal email addresses. Who’s telling the jokes? The U.S. Senate already has defeated the measure, and this week the U.S. House of Representatives is going to vote on a Congressional Review Act resolution that the Senate has already passed to tell the NLRB to stop using government power to benefit union bosses. Last we heard, doling out workers’ personal contact information is a desecration of basic privacy entitlements and will inevitably lead to workers being targeted for harassment at the hands of union leadership. As your fellow Americans did with respect to the Senate vote, you should tell your House representative that you want privacy protected by sending a virtual “Do Not Disturb” letter at http://friends.channeldemocracy.com. And, as Human Events noted: Unlike the government’s proposal, this letter is voluntary.

* * *

Last week, one of our managing editors, Robert Herrington, hit the nail squarely on the head, when he penned a column taking “nearly invisible” candidates to task. We’ll parrot here what he proffered. The act of public service is serious business, just as is running for public office. Many candidates have declared for the primary election, and some of them even attend public meetings, like those of councils and boards. Some. Others are content to just hit the trail. It seems to us that if one wants to serve, he or she should make it a point to attend and grasp the goings-on of such panels. Knowing the issues, challenges and opportunities and fully understanding them are separate animals. Ask your candidates (unless they already serve): Do you attend the meetings, and what have you gleaned from them? Then listen carefully. It will help you cast an informed vote on May 5. You are going to vote, correct?


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
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