Showing pigs a family affair

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Ty Macy, left, watches as his cousin, Trent Horney of Westfield, shows a pig during the Youth Swine Exhibition in the Show Arena. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Years before they will be eligible to compete in the 4-H Swine Show, young children were given the opportunity to show pigs inside the Show Arena with the assistance of an older 4-H’er – usually a family member.

“It was fun. I told her what I was taught,” Blake Webel said after being in the ring assisting his younger sister, Ashley.

Trent Horney of Westfield made his first attempt showing with the assistance of his cousin, Ty Macy.

“It was fun; it was cool,” Horney said. “(Ty) told me if I see a scratch don’t hit it.”

While it was his first time in the ring, Horney has watched the swine show.

“I now know how to show a pig,” he said.

Horney’s mother, Katie, used to show animals when she was younger.

“It was really exciting – a proud mom moment,” she said. “We’ve been practicing for weeks. He’d walk the pigs and sheep.”

Pork Producers President Andy Zeller said event is aimed to promote the swine project to kids.

“Numbers have been going down for years. Hamilton County is more urban and losing farm ground. We wanted to do something where the younger kids could get out and show the animals,” he said.

Zeller said the project is an important learning tool that teaches ownership and showmanship.

“It teaches them what it takes to get a baby pig up to market weight and they understand the food chain,” he said.

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Showing pigs a family affair

0
Ty Macy, left, watches as his cousin, Trent Horney of Westfield, shows a pig during the Youth Swine Exhibition in the Show Arena. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Ty Macy, left, watches as his cousin, Trent Horney of Westfield, shows a pig during the Youth Swine Exhibition in the Show Arena. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Years before they will be eligible to compete in the 4-H Swine Show, young children were given the opportunity to show pigs inside the Show Arena with the assistance of an older 4-H’er – usually a family member.

“It was fun. I told her what I was taught,” Blake Webel said after being in the ring assisting his younger sister, Ashley.

Trent Horney of Westfield made his first attempt showing with the assistance of his cousin, Ty Macy.

“It was fun; it was cool,” Horney said. “(Ty) told me if I see a scratch don’t hit it.”

While it was his first time in the ring, Horney has watched the swine show.

“I now know how to show a pig,” he said.

Horney’s mother, Katie, used to show animals when she was younger.

“It was really exciting – a proud mom moment,” she said. “We’ve been practicing for weeks. He’d walk the pigs and sheep.”

Pork Producers President Andy Zeller said event is aimed to promote the swine project to kids.

“Numbers have been going down for years. Hamilton County is more urban and losing farm ground. We wanted to do something where the younger kids could get out and show the animals,” he said.

Zeller said the project is an important learning tool that teaches ownership and showmanship.

“It teaches them what it takes to get a baby pig up to market weight and they understand the food chain,” he said.

Share.

Showing pigs a family affair

0
Ty Macy, left, watches as his cousin, Trent Horney of Westfield, shows a pig during the Youth Swine Exhibition in the Show Arena. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Ty Macy, left, watches as his cousin, Trent Horney of Westfield, shows a pig during the Youth Swine Exhibition in the Show Arena. (Photo by Robert Herrington)

Years before they will be eligible to compete in the 4-H Swine Show, young children were given the opportunity to show pigs inside the Show Arena with the assistance of an older 4-H’er – usually a family member.

“It was fun. I told her what I was taught,” Blake Webel said after being in the ring assisting his younger sister, Ashley.

Trent Horney of Westfield made his first attempt showing with the assistance of his cousin, Ty Macy.

“It was fun; it was cool,” Horney said. “(Ty) told me if I see a scratch don’t hit it.”

While it was his first time in the ring, Horney has watched the swine show.

“I now know how to show a pig,” he said.

Horney’s mother, Katie, used to show animals when she was younger.

“It was really exciting – a proud mom moment,” she said. “We’ve been practicing for weeks. He’d walk the pigs and sheep.”

Pork Producers President Andy Zeller said event is aimed to promote the swine project to kids.

“Numbers have been going down for years. Hamilton County is more urban and losing farm ground. We wanted to do something where the younger kids could get out and show the animals,” he said.

Zeller said the project is an important learning tool that teaches ownership and showmanship.

“It teaches them what it takes to get a baby pig up to market weight and they understand the food chain,” he said.

Share.