Riding in cars with dogs

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It is that time of the year, and things are finally beginning to heat up. We must be ever vigilant about our pets (and kids, too) and leaving them in the car when the outside temps are above 65 degrees. There are also many factors to allowing your dog to ride in the car with you.

Consider all the canine passenger safeguards and select the one that will best suit your dog and your circumstances.

Train your dog to behave in the car like you train him to do anything: by setting him up for success, and reinforcing the desired calm behavior.

Be on the lookout for dogs at risk of heatstroke in cars on warm days. Don’t hesitate to call animal protection authorities or the police department if you see a dog suffering from the heat.

Other situations that warrant concern are:

  • A dog that interferes with the driver’s physical ability to drive the car. A dog sitting on the driver’s lap can interfere with steering. A dog who gets on or under the accelerator or brake pedals, hits the gear shift, or blocks the driver’s view can cause an accident.
  • A dog who interferes with the driver’s mental ability to drive the car. When the driver’s attention is taken away from the road to deal with the dog’s behavior, the dog has become a safety hazard.
  •  A loose dog can become a flying missile if the car stops abruptly or is hit by another car. If the car windows break or the doors pop open in an accident, a loose dog can escape, get hit on the road, or run off and become lost. A loose dog also can fall or jump out of an open window or back of a truck.
  • A dog with their head out a window can suffer injury to their eyes from flying debris, or worse, can have their head smashed by objects that pass too close to the car ( other vehicles, mirrors, signs, branches, etc.).

The temperature in a parked car on a warm (not even hot) day can kill a dog. Even on a cloudy day, cars can become uncomfortable and way too warm for your pet, even after a short time. As a rule, cracking the window on warm sunny days is not enough, so be very careful.

My rule of thumb is if it is above 60 degrees and the sun is shining, I don’t leave Karma in the car. I can leave all the windows open and she will not jump out, however that does not keep someone from taking her out of the car, so I just don’t do it.

John and Karma
Izzy’s Place a Dog Bakery


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Share.

Riding in cars with dogs

0

It is that time of the year, and things are finally beginning to heat up. We must be ever vigilant about our pets (and kids, too) and leaving them in the car when the outside temps are above 65 degrees. There are also many factors to allowing your dog to ride in the car with you.

Consider all the canine passenger safeguards and select the one that will best suit your dog and your circumstances.

Train your dog to behave in the car like you train him to do anything: by setting him up for success, and reinforcing the desired calm behavior.

Be on the lookout for dogs at risk of heatstroke in cars on warm days. Don’t hesitate to call animal protection authorities or the police department if you see a dog suffering from the heat.

Other situations that warrant concern are:

  • A dog that interferes with the driver’s physical ability to drive the car. A dog sitting on the driver’s lap can interfere with steering. A dog who gets on or under the accelerator or brake pedals, hits the gear shift, or blocks the driver’s view can cause an accident.
  • A dog who interferes with the driver’s mental ability to drive the car. When the driver’s attention is taken away from the road to deal with the dog’s behavior, the dog has become a safety hazard.
  •  A loose dog can become a flying missile if the car stops abruptly or is hit by another car. If the car windows break or the doors pop open in an accident, a loose dog can escape, get hit on the road, or run off and become lost. A loose dog also can fall or jump out of an open window or back of a truck.
  • A dog with their head out a window can suffer injury to their eyes from flying debris, or worse, can have their head smashed by objects that pass too close to the car ( other vehicles, mirrors, signs, branches, etc.).

The temperature in a parked car on a warm (not even hot) day can kill a dog. Even on a cloudy day, cars can become uncomfortable and way too warm for your pet, even after a short time. As a rule, cracking the window on warm sunny days is not enough, so be very careful.

My rule of thumb is if it is above 60 degrees and the sun is shining, I don’t leave Karma in the car. I can leave all the windows open and she will not jump out, however that does not keep someone from taking her out of the car, so I just don’t do it.


Current Morning Briefing Logo

Stay CURRENT with our daily newsletter (M-F) and breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox for free!

Select list(s) to subscribe to



By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: Current Publishing, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN, 46032, https://www.youarecurrent.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact
Share.